Center for Dynamic Magneto-Optics

World News Article:

 Optical Magnetism: Photons induce high levels of magnetism in optical materials

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First Light achieved at DYNAMO CEP LASER FACILITY at the University of Michigan:

Researchers at the MURI Center for Dynamics Magneto-Optics at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor have reached a milestone in their drive to establish the first amplified laser source in the state operating with carrier-envelope phase (CEP) stabilization. Funded by a DURIP grant from AFOSR under PI Dr. Ayan Chakrabarty, and working with representatives from Amplitude, Continuum and Venteon, the researchers have achieved first light with the fully automated solid state system. CEP operation of the oscillator has already been demonstrated. When complete, the system will emit 25 fs pulses at 10 kHz and be operable as a tunable source over a wavelength range of 100 nm or as an amplified CEP source, without requiring any adjustments of the pulse compressor to switch modes. The researchers are planning to use the source to investigate the onset and decay of magneto-electric nonlinearities and to exert coherent control over them.

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Welcome to the MURI Center for Dynamic Magneto-Optics (DYNAMO) at the University of Michigan, which supports investigations of intense magneto-optic phenomena with relevance to electromagnetic energy conversion, Terahertz generation, and high frequency (optical) magnetism.  New methods are being developed to convert light directly to THz radiation or electricity, to induce large magnetic fields in normally non-magnetic materials, to induce harmonic generation by magneto-electric means, and to explore connections between relativistic and non-relativistic optical phenomena. In this inter-disciplinary effort, University of Michigan researchers are joined by colleagues in a variety of departments at Northwestern University, Stanford, and the University of Central Florida as well as international collaborators. Forefront approaches that combine materials chemistry, ultrafast optical science and nonlinear mathematical analysis are being used to meet the research challenges of understanding and harnessing dynamic magneto-optic phenomena on this new frontier.